Topic: Silent Horror Films

any fans of silent horror movies? if so, Whats your Favorite one? Favorite actor/actress?

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Last edited by dakotamoon (2012-07-27 08:35:24)

Re: Silent Horror Films

I've only seen three that I can recall:

Phantom of the Opera

Nosferatu

London After Midnight -- though this one doesn't really count.  It's a lost film; no known print exists.  But back in the early 2000s AMC aired the movie recreated from a compilation of still shots, set to a musical score.  I'd say that's the closest anyone alive today has come to having seen the actual movie.

Oh!  And I've seen bits and pieces of one called The Golem, but that was years and years ago.

Re: Silent Horror Films

London after midnight is so infamous! You want to see it just because it's like the Holy Grail!

Re: Silent Horror Films

I know I posted this sometime before, and it's not all silent films, but it's a nifty 15 minute pieces on lost early horror films.  It does discus non-lost silent horror films a bit, too.
History buffs should enjoy it.

(Supposedly, there were some King Movies made in Japan in the 30s!)

Last edited by azathoth (2012-07-29 02:28:24)

Re: Silent Horror Films

I'm not expert and have seen very few, but I love and own Nosferatu, as it is one of my favorite vampire films.  The Phantom of the Opera is also a beautifully atmospheric gothic horror film.

I recently watched and appreciated The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari.  It's very obvious that Tim Burton derived a lot of visual influence from it.  This impressionist style was also evident in Son of Frankenstein.

The last one I really enjoy, but takes a little patience to get through on the first viewing is Haxan.  It's basically a documentary about witchcraft in the Middle Ages that drags in quite a few places, but also contains some of the most strikingly evocative images of diabolism committed to film.  Like Disney's Night On Bald Mountain segment from Fantasia, parts of it are the closest anyone has come to capturing the spirit of Halloween on film.

Re: Silent Horror Films

Maxwell wrote:

I recently watched and appreciated The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari.  It's very obvious that Tim Burton derived a lot of visual influence from it.  This impressionist style was also evident in Son of Frankenstein.

Caligari is a really good film. The visuals on it alone are well worth seeing the film for.