Topic: Quentin Tarantino

Y'know, I actually think I'm starting to like the films of Quentin Tarantino a lot more than I used to! smile

I remember way back in 1994, I first saw Pulp Fiction when it was playing in a local theater. I enjoyed watching it, but I felt somewhat ambivalent about the overall artistic sensibility of this Quentin Tarantino guy. (At that point, I hadn't yet seen Reservoir Dogs.) And it's kind of difficult for me to put my finger on exactly why I felt this way.

Perhaps it was because I thought that Tarantino's overall style was just a little too clever and contrived. Don't get me wrong, I like the non-linear method of storytelling a great deal, but to me there seemed to be something almost self-consciously cinematic about his whole approach, and it kind of took me out of the story. Also, the whole shooting-the-breeze conversational quality of the dialogue sort of had the opposite effect from the one that Tarantino intended. I know that he was trying to be realistic by having his characters talking about matters unrelated to the plot-related business, but it just came across as a bit of an affectation to me.

However, little by little I've been slowly warming up to Quentin's whole style. I liked both of the Kill Bill movies (mainly because I looked at them as a kind of post-modern stylistic exercise), and I also had a fun time at Grindhouse. (Although I must confess to liking Robert Rodriguez's Planet Terror much more than Tarantino's Death Proof.)

In spite of Tarantino's strong dislike of what was done to his original story, I've always been a devout fan of Oliver Stone's controversial Natural Born Killers. (And believe me, Quentin's stylistic fingerprints still remain visible no matter how many changes Stone made.)

I've always been a big fan of horror movies, and Tarantino's horror connections have also played a key role in my warming up to his work. I saw Robert Rodriguez's From Dusk Till Dawn (which he starred in and co-wrote) in the theater in 1996, and enjoyed it very much. His own film company re-released Lucio Fulci's 1981 zombie classic The Beyond in 1998, and more recently he was the executive producer for Eli Roth's Hostel films, which I personally believe are modern classics of the more "extreme" variety of the genre.

So Quentin Tarantino is still not one of my all-time filmmakers, but it's hard to argue with his talent, his enthusiasm, or the sheer uniqueness of his work. The best thing you could possibly say about any filmmaker is that you just know when you're watching one of his films even if you've never seen it before and missed the credits! big_smile

Last edited by Darth Pazuzu (2007-07-23 18:30:44)

Re: Quentin Tarantino

Tarantino is at least a MAN who got where he is by hard work unlike the Hack Roth who's Dad made things happen.

Re: Quentin Tarantino

Tarantino films for some reason to me are like nails on a chalkboard.  It's ok once, but after repeated times it just begins to make you cringe.

Re: Quentin Tarantino

Tarantino is fantastic.. I've always loved his films and he is one of those directors who pays close attention to the score he uses in his films. Something I have always championed. My first Tarantino film was Reservoir Dogs and I loved the casual talk that take place in most of his films.. It makes them real.. How often in real life do you talk about one thing and thats it? It's just not realistic..

He also has a great semse of humor and I guess the reason I like the guy so much is he loves the same kind of movies I do. Which always helps when you are directing one..

Re: Quentin Tarantino

Tarantino is a fan that got lucky.  What's wrong with that?  Are people jealous?  Seriously, he is such a fanboy, and it really shows through his amazing films.  We're lucky to have someone like Tarantino making films from the heart as oppossed to half the bullshit Hollywood lugs at us.  And like Goon said, he loves the same under-appreciated movies that I do.

And, Wayne, you're so wrong about Eli Roth.  If you actually read about the man or his four year stretch in film school, then you'd realize that he worked very hard to get where he is today.

Tarantino and Roth are my two prime examples of fans who made it big.

Re: Quentin Tarantino

i havent seen a whole lot of Tarantino's films, but i absolutely love Pulp Fiction.

Re: Quentin Tarantino

I still dont like him, and I do not own a single one of his movies.  I just dont get why they are popular.  Nothing about them really does anything for me.  I usually get bored with all the unnecessary bullshit that i just turn it off.

Re: Quentin Tarantino

i can understand why you dont like him Jim, hes pretty much a love/hate director.

Re: Quentin Tarantino

Tim can we start a  theid on our debate? I can be wrong from time to time and would love the chance for a full scale discustion. 
Roth might have gone to Film School 1000's do that fact of the matter is that Eli's father being who he is opened doors on his name and nothing else.
Sorry for the misspelling it is 0600 and need more coffie

Re: Quentin Tarantino

He also volunteered his time on film sets to meet new people and get his name out there.  Not only that, but he made "Cabin Fever" on a budget of 1.5 million, which made over $30,000,000 world wide and became Lions Gate top grossing film of that year.  That's, not hard work?

Re: Quentin Tarantino

Wayne50 wrote:

Tim can we start a  theid on our debate? I can be wrong from time to time and would love the chance for a full scale discustion.

If you search for Eli Roth in the forum search, you will find MANY threads dedicated to Eli, love him or hate him.  We get into LOTS of Roth debates around here, so I dunno if we need a brand new thread to debate on since so many others exist.

Re: Quentin Tarantino

somehow Roth and Boll can be brought up i almost any thread lol

Re: Quentin Tarantino

Works for me. I do have respect for anyone who gets a film done. I respect those who can make money on a film.
Bit of a diffence between say Deathgate666 doing it (if I may) and doing it when your father is a rich powerful Hollywood insider.
Maybe I would not care so much if he (Eli) was nicer to folks then of couse there is stories about Q.T. and past girlfreinds. Oh Well

Re: Quentin Tarantino

A rich powerful Hollywood insider?  Last I heard, Roth's dad is a doctor.  I'm not exactly sure what kind, but a doctor, nonetheless.  I'm not sure where you heard otherwise.

Re: Quentin Tarantino

Talking of tarantino i thought death proof was well good. About 90% of comments i have read about it have said that its boring but i didnt find it boring at all, i thought it captured the grindhouse feel of films like the pinky violence films very well and overall was better than planet terror imo. It just needed more of stuntman mike and maybe some lezbo action between the main female stars then it would have been more exploitation. Anyway i would give it 7.5 of 10.

Re: Quentin Tarantino

TiM the Zombie wrote:

A rich powerful Hollywood insider?  Last I heard, Roth's dad is a doctor.  I'm not exactly sure what kind, but a doctor, nonetheless.  I'm not sure where you heard otherwise.

Psychiatrist.

Also, on the Cabin Fever front, it premiered at the Toronto Film Fest and that's when studio's started bidding on it.  Therefore, people had to have the foresight to know that it was going to be successful after seeing it.

Re: Quentin Tarantino

TiM the Zombie wrote:

Tarantino is a fan that got lucky.  What's wrong with that?  Are people jealous?  Seriously, he is such a fanboy, and it really shows through his amazing films.  We're lucky to have someone like Tarantino making films from the heart as oppossed to half the bullshit Hollywood lugs at us.  And like Goon said, he loves the same under-appreciated movies that I do.

And, Wayne, you're so wrong about Eli Roth.  If you actually read about the man or his four year stretch in film school, then you'd realize that he worked very hard to get where he is today.

Tarantino and Roth are my two prime examples of fans who made it big.

You said it all TiM smile

Re: Quentin Tarantino

I dig Tarantino for the most part.  He's got a great ear for dialogue and I love how he Frankensteins different genres and reinvents them into something new and fresh. 

Loved True Romance, Reservoir Dogs, never saw NBK, loved Pulp Fiction, Jackie Brown...didn't much care for Kill Bill, though -- I thought Kill Bill 2 was better. 

But now he's lending his name to crap like Hostel and Hostel 2...I'm noticing a visible decline, here.

Deathproof was a severe misfire, IMO.  It captured the grindhouse feel better than Rodriguez's Planet Terror, but Tarantino's always been able to capture that kooky 70s feel so that's no big compliment.  The first half of Deathproof is all about QT's foot and leg fetish, and both halves are just way, way too talky, with the bulk of the talk not really being all that interesting.  Come the second half of Deathproof it felt like an entirely different movie.  Not just because of an entirely different cast and set of characters, but also because Stuntman Mike went from lecherously charming psychopath to whiny little crybaby.  It was funny watching Kurt Russell scream like a little girl with a skinned knee after getting shot in the arm, but in terms of the movie overall -- a complete 180 from the first half. 

QT had all the right ingredients to make Deathproof an exploitation/b-movie masterpiece, but he blew it.  And I'd wager to say it's because he's starting to buy into his own hype.

Re: Quentin Tarantino

I have to say that I have been a QT fan since seeing Reservoir Dogs when I was younger.  I'm also firmly in the Death Proof camp, a great blend of dialogue and intensity.  I think the Hostel stuff was more of a goof for Tarentino, and no more one of his films than was anything 'Presented by' Spielburg.  I think the best thing about QT is that he never gives you what you want, but rather what he wants to present as an artist.  Don't like it?  No problem.  He'll go on reinventing genres anyway.

Re: Quentin Tarantino

Lots of ppl said that death proof was borin but i thought it was awesome and looked like a pinky violence film, i think it captured the grindhosue look perfectly

Re: Quentin Tarantino

Yeah, being a complete Grindhouse nut, I thought that QT did an excellent job at capturing the look and feel.  That's not really saying much, though, because all of his films have been able to succeed at that.

Re: Quentin Tarantino

I was the same way with Grindhouse.  I walked out of that movie with the same charge I had when I had seen Evil Dead 2 for the first time.  There was such a sense of fun and glee at putting on the screen something that borrowed from a certain type of B-movie, but elevated it to a real cult film status.  I hope they don't try to split the film for the dvd release.  I'd be interested to see individual extended versions of both films, but on initial viewing, you'd just be cheating yourself to see it any other way than the theatrical release.

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Re: Quentin Tarantino

bad news bro its being split as was reported on our site. do a quick search and you will find it. Big time studio cash in.

Re: Quentin Tarantino

Guess I'll just have to wait for the special edition, then.  I'll be curious to see the 'missing' reels, but that's definitely a bummer.  I feel sorry for those who didn't get to the theater to see it in all it's glory.  And because the audience I saw it with just went with it the whole time... gasps, laughs, and cheers.  One of the best theater experiences I've had outside seeing Army of Darkness opening night.

Re: Quentin Tarantino

Please forgive my error. I was very wrong and I ask the group and Mr. Roth's forgiveness.
I may not like Mr. Roth's films but he did do them on his own. That is worth a lot.
Goes to show that fact checking your fact checks in very critacal