Topic: Troma Films and Independent Filmmaking

Hey, so I'm a student filmmaker and a big genre buff. I've always loved Troma Films and their easy-going approach to filmmaking--Lloyd Kaufman's been a huge inspiration. His new book, Sell Your Own Damn Movie, has been really helpful for me in terms of producing and distributing short films. What do you guys think? Also, check out his reject covers: http://www.focalpress.com/giveaway.aspx … +own+damn. Pretty great, yeah?

Re: Troma Films and Independent Filmmaking

I think the one thing Kaufman has going for him is that he is violently independent.  Even when given the opportunity to get in on something more mainstream, he bucks it. 

It's a shame, actually.  He's got enough moxie that I think he could do something really exciting within the mainstream.  I'd like to see him exert his talents instead of relying and insisting on T&A and Bromo Seltzer.

Granted, the world needs ditch-diggers, too, but he's got the intelligence to do something better.

Re: Troma Films and Independent Filmmaking

I'm a Troma fan, but I have to watch their films in moderation. That shit gets old really fast sometimes.

Last edited by Suspiria_89 (2011-06-03 15:03:11)

Re: Troma Films and Independent Filmmaking

I gotta get this new book smile

To be quite honest reading Direct/Produce Your Own Damn Movie I found quite helpful when working on my projects.  When it came to trying to negotiate with actors, scheduling, directing, deciding responsibilities.  Grant it my thesis never materialized due to slight *major understatement* problem of previous students destroying good locations; but his words carried me through and helped quite a bit.

I think Kaufman has been able to distill necessary and good information in an easily digestible and engaging read.  I've read other film books at film school; but the problem is that they're far too analytical, scientific and generally dull.  I actually found myself quoting Kaufman to a classmate when he said he was worried about an actor being difficult and threaten to drop out during the shoot; told him to schedule his film chronologically so that if the actor does that he can easily write in the character's demise/departure.  The actor was in the finished film, dunno if my classmate let the actor in on the scheme or they had a change of heart.

Coming from a film student perspective in all honesty, yeah I'll buy this as I know that 1. I'm getting needed information from someone whose worked in the industry and 2. it's gonna be fun as hell to read smile

Last edited by thegoldensimatar (2011-06-06 09:35:59)

Re: Troma Films and Independent Filmmaking

Haven't read the book... though hear fairly decent things. Nevertheless, a friend of mine shot a horror feature in 09', Troma picked it up last year, all the paperwork ink has dried, but the film is nowhere to be seen, and Troma keeps giving him the major run around with regard to its "promised" release, and even something as minor as listing the film on Troma 's website... which they told him they would be doing but haven't yet.  It's my friends first feature, and it's been pretty stressful for him since signing the rights away to Kaufman & Co. It's been a year and he has no clue what they're doing with it.

Re: Troma Films and Independent Filmmaking

all the paperwork ink has dried, but the film is nowhere to be seen, and Troma keeps giving him the major run around with regard to its release

That's a problem with every movie I've had, all my films have been picked up by a distributor at one time or another, and only one of them only released it, which is why I release ALL my movies myself, I know exactly how much my movies are going to cost, I know exactly how many movies I sell, I have total control, I gave up on distributors a long time ago.

Last edited by Sonny (2011-06-10 20:33:10)

Re: Troma Films and Independent Filmmaking

I went with cover 2.  It just screams 'classy.'  Excuse me while I try to stop laughing....

Re: Troma Films and Independent Filmmaking

Hi,

I write some article about independent Filmmaking. You can take a look.

Truth about Independent Filmmaking

Re: Troma Films and Independent Filmmaking

screw it, dumb

Last edited by azathoth (2011-06-20 06:47:47)

Re: Troma Films and Independent Filmmaking

Has anyone submited a script with him? Any feedback from them? I'm thinking of sending them something but I want to see if it's worth it before I snail mail it to them

Re: Troma Films and Independent Filmmaking

What does it cost, $1.50?  Send it anyway and enclose a pre-stamped envelop for a reply.

Re: Troma Films and Independent Filmmaking

Well, hopefully you know to QUERY FIRST.  If you send anyone a script unsolicited, chances are it'll wind up in a trash can.  No film studio wants the legal issues inherent with an unsolicited script.

If you don't know how to write a query letter, go here: http://www.craftyscreenwriting.com/query.html

Re: Troma Films and Independent Filmmaking

Yeah I'm up on that. Their website says they'll accept screenplay submissions only via snail mail. They accept e-mail queries for distribution but not for specs. The problem is I'm in Europe and I don't want to post something that will just get thrown in the trash anyway. I've checked all the script writing websites (deal done pro, etc) and no one seems to have had much experiemce with them (surprising). So I was hoping to see if anyone actually had a response to a submission with them.

Re: Troma Films and Independent Filmmaking

I enjoy independent genre films, but am getting tired of every kid with a copy of Final Cut Pro and an HD digital camera assuming their film is worth watching. Indie films are very much like mainstream flicks from Hollywood... maybe 1 in 100 is REALLY worth seeing. I am happy we live in an age where anyone has a chance to make something. There are just sooooo many egotistical douche bag horror fans who think 10 friends, 4 gallons of fake blood, and a 5 day shoot make "great independent cinema". Bless Lloyd and his likes though... inspiration is hard to find these days. I am glad people out there finally recognize just how much he has done. And kudos to all those trying. Just edit and censor yourself, don't assume everything you do is genius, and try to make films that people other than your friends and family would want to watch. The genre needs quality, not quantity.