Re: The Science-y Stuff Thread

Holy shit, I forgot I started this whole thing, and forgot about it when the sciency shows took a break.

Here's a nifty one I bought way back when I was a teenager, Superluminal Loopholes; faster than light.
I'm sure you could pick it up in a library or on Ebay for cheaper than Amazon has it for. 

Did you know that some Japanese scientists actually achieved quatom entanglement for a short period of time?  And you didn't even mention Schrodinger's cat?  For shame, padawan.  tongue

But seriously, if this type stuff is interesting to you, keep digging deeper, it only gets more bizarre and funky the more you learn.  For example, did you know that topicology-wise, we're the same as donuts?

Re: The Science-y Stuff Thread

^ I actually have over a notebook page full of books that I plan on buying this summer (if I get the job that I'm wanting), I'll add the Superluminal Loopholes; faster than light to it too, if I don't find it at the Library.

And Schrodinger's cat? You've just now introduced me to him. lol

As for the humans = donuts, no I haven't. Care to share? lol

Re: The Science-y Stuff Thread

^^
A donut is just a toroid, like this-
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/d/db/Toroidal_coord.png/250px-Toroidal_coord.png

Squish a human down vertically, and the top of that picture is your mouth, and the bottom is, well, the other end.  A hole through the entire structure.

Schrody's cat was an extension of the double slit experiment.  Stick a cat in a box with radiation/poison/etc that has a 50% chance of going off and killing the cat.  According to the uncertainty principle, the cat is 50% dead and 50% alive until you open the box to check on it, and thus the observation collapses the uncertainty function to a ground state of either dead or alive.  I'm guessing in the meantime the alive cat is playing ghost chess with the dead cat.  big_smile

I find it very cool that you are taking such an interest in science.  You remind me of myself in that way- I never pass up a good science book.  For fun there a couple of books on the science of Star Trek and Star Wars, they take the fantastic and figure out what it would take to actually do that stuff.  They are appropriately called "The Science of..."

Holy Jeebus, talking quantum mechanics on a horror movie site.  No wonder I love this place!

Last edited by azathoth (2012-06-03 18:17:21)

Re: The Science-y Stuff Thread

azathoth wrote:

^^
A donut is just a toroid, like this-
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/d/db/Toroidal_coord.png/250px-Toroidal_coord.png

Squish a human down vertically, and the top of that picture is your mouth, and the bottom is, well, the other end.  A hole through the entire structure.

Oh my god, lol, that is incredibley strange. I love it.
There needs to be a cheesy horror movie that's done that....somebody gets squashed vertically and turns into a donut - hahaha.

Regarding Shrodinger's cat, that also very interesting. The Uncertainty Factor is something I need to study a bit more first though.

Quantum Physics and other weird scienc-y things need to be combined into a cheesy horror movie.

Re: The Science-y Stuff Thread

There was one a few years ago, a foreign film I believe, that was rather talky but was well received.  I think it was basically 2 guys talking about weird stuff that was happening in science terms.  But damn if I can remember the name of it.  sad

There is an interesting book called "Hellstar" by Michael Reeves and Steve Perry that deals with physics and meta-physics on a starship.  About 300 pages, rather weird, but enjoyable (Vampy told me not to give her such a weird sci-fi book again lol ).  Amazon has used copies for $0.01 (plus shipping, of course), but it's old enough to be found in a library.

Re: The Science-y Stuff Thread

^ Although I have never been able to really go to my town's library, my mom visited it the other day to print something off for her work, and she told me it was pittifully small. No wonder we're living in the middle of Wisconsin and yet people in this town still think it's a grand idea to put up confederate flags. lol

But, I think I will be relying on Amazon a bit this summer. I just picked up an application at the Holiday Gas Station, which is where my mom is working. She was cool enough to squeeze a word in for me, so I think there is a good chance I will be hired. And if it's just a little money coming in for me, that's good enough.

I just wanna buy books and movies and music before I graduate from my high school.
So, there is a good chance I'll be reading a lot of books that you have read (and following in the literary path of the Monkey Lord will be interesting indeed).

Last edited by The Creature (2012-06-06 06:34:15)

Re: The Science-y Stuff Thread

^^
Anytime you want a recommendation, let me know, I'll just peruse through me and my dad's books.  Hell, I could just mail a bunch of them to you with that USPS "if it fits in the box" thing as loaners.  Eh, whatever, let me know.

Re: The Science-y Stuff Thread

Morgan Freeman's 'Through the Wormhole' starts up again tonight on the Science channel.  Tonight's episode is about alternate dimensions and possible multiple universes.

Re: The Science-y Stuff Thread

azathoth wrote:

^^
Anytime you want a recommendation, let me know, I'll just peruse through me and my dad's books.  Hell, I could just mail a bunch of them to you with that USPS "if it fits in the box" thing as loaners.  Eh, whatever, let me know.

Hey, that's cool of you to offer, Azzy, but I'm good here I think. I'm happy to buy my own - owning books just feels good. lol

As for recommendations, I will for sure check in and ask if I find a book you might have read, thanks!

Re: The Science-y Stuff Thread

^^
Cool, cool. smile

Re: The Science-y Stuff Thread

Guess those neutrinos weren't as fast as CERN thought:

http://www.rawstory.com/rs/2012/06/08/e … ers-admit/

Re: The Science-y Stuff Thread

New "Through the Wormhole" with Morgan Freeman tonight.  The topic is "What is nohthing?"  Discusses how violent an absolute vacuum actually is.  And yeah, zero-point energy fluctuations could invert our entire universe.  Sleep tight!  big_smile
Science Channel at 10PM US Eastern.

Re: The Science-y Stuff Thread

^ I'll have to check that show out. Morgan Freeman narrorating the universe? Epic.

Just wanted to mention, there are a few astronomy/cosmology documentaries on Netflix:
The Universe (5 seasons)
How The Universe Workds (1 season w/ Mike Rowe)
Into The Universe w/ Stephen Hawking (3 episodes)
Carl Sagain's Cosmos (classic 1980 show)
The Cosmos: The Beginner's Guide (6 episodes)

Re: The Science-y Stuff Thread

azathoth wrote:

New "Through the Wormhole" with Morgan Freeman tonight.  The topic is "What is nohthing?"  Discusses how violent an absolute vacuum actually is.  And yeah, zero-point energy fluctuations could invert our entire universe.  Sleep tight!  big_smile
Science Channel at 10PM US Eastern.

nothing: the only thing the human brain can’t imagine

Re: The Science-y Stuff Thread

@Creature- nice list!
Don't know if it's on Netflix, but Nova but in the 80s was nice.
And more earth-bound, but still good, was Connections.

Damn- I got a mini-me on my hands.  And probably smarter than me, to boot.  lol

Re: The Science-y Stuff Thread

If you wanna watch some wacky sci-fi stuff, I'd reccomend Lost. Sure the Time travel, Dharma Initiative, and constant and variable stuff might be confusing but you gotta love Daniel Faraday the ultimate physics geek.

Re: The Science-y Stuff Thread

azathoth wrote:

@Creature- nice list!
Don't know if it's on Netflix, but Nova but in the 80s was nice.
And more earth-bound, but still good, was Connections.

Damn- I got a mini-me on my hands.  And probably smarter than me, to boot.  lol

I"ll check and see if I can find those shows either on Netflix or Youtube. I watched a Nova documentary on Quantum Physics the other day though, but I don't think it was an 80s episode.


CERN's press release on the discovery of the higgs-boson particle, oooooh:
http://press.web.cern.ch/press/PressRel … 7.12E.html

Re: The Science-y Stuff Thread

Why don't u esteemed science figures debate if there is any possibility of the human centipede to become reality within our lifetimes (Is it '100% medically acurate'?). A tough question im sure Newton would find hard to solve. Get the NASA boys onto it now i say.

Last edited by Vasquez (2012-07-04 14:21:40)

Re: The Science-y Stuff Thread

http://i829.photobucket.com/albums/zz216/Peacefulrain09/Movies/21jumpstreet.gif

Re: The Science-y Stuff Thread

Vasquez wrote:

Why don't u esteemed science figures debate if there is any possibility of the human centipede to become reality within our lifetimes (Is it '100% medically acurate'?). A tough question im sure Newton would find hard to solve. Get the NASA boys onto it now i say.

Not a bad idear there, Vasquex, not bad at all. I'd be interested to know (however...bizzare that interest may be? haha). Not sure Newton or NASA would be up for this case however...I guess we'd better leave it to the mad scientists of the underground to give us all a full, detailed report.

(Kidding, eating feces is not fun for many, many people - Or so the statistics say).

Re: The Science-y Stuff Thread

Hey.....Azzy....I have a question about gravity!

So....the curvature of space is often explained as how gravity works (Einstein's Theory of Relativity), right?

There is an analogy for the curvature of space (which I'm sure you've heard of before) about a bowling ball in the middle of a trampoline. The ball sinks in, creating the curvature around it; which is an analogy of course for space and the mass of the object. But since space is not flat, like a trampoline, does this analogy really work that accurately? Space is, after all, 3-dimensional.

I've also seen diagrams illustrating that space is curved inward toward the object all around it, and it does not curve outward like a ball in the middle of a trampoline.

Like this one:
http://i1261.photobucket.com/albums/ii597/creaturekillswell/SpacetimeCurves.jpg


Just looking for thoughts? Please let me know if I'm mixing something up!

Re: The Science-y Stuff Thread

Gahh! I've got another question, and this is for anyone who has an answer or a guess.

Superposition of different particles....does superposition really apply to macroscopic objects, too?
I know Schrodinger's cat was invented to show that such a thing is absurd, but has it been proved otherwise?

Could objects as large as living animals really be in a superposition state when not observed (ignoring the fact that the cat may observe itself) ?

Re: The Science-y Stuff Thread

The representation of gravity graphically is mostly just for us to get a picture of it in our heads.  Especially when you consider space-time is 4 dimensions.  That diagram you posted looks more like the gravity attraction lines rather than the standard space-time deformation.  And we really don't understand gravity all that well.  We have math for it, but we haven't figured out the underlying principle of the force.  Which is why it's still outside the Standard Model.

Superposition-  Here we get funky.  Everything can be considered as a waveform.  The easiest one is light- a photon is also a light wave.  The bigger something gets, the more complex the waveform and what I can only call a higher frequency.  So having actual superposition is less likely than Planck's Number odds.  But, if you blow up a watermelon, there is no law that says it can't reassemble itself.  Just very unlikely.  And some weird conservation of energy juggling.

Hope that helps.

And here's some fun, scientists have found a dark matter filament.  It connects 2 galaxy clusters and is 58 million light-years long.
Now where's the darkbulb?  big_smile

Re: The Science-y Stuff Thread

^ Thank you, Azzy. You're awesome. Your explanations do help, I now have some thoughts to chew over.

and dude, those are awesome articles. Dark matter filaments 58 million light-years long....the mind is b-b-boggled. Space.com looks like a cool website, too.

Last edited by The Creature (2012-07-05 22:13:45)

Re: The Science-y Stuff Thread

Haha!  I knew it. 
IEEE's main magazine has an article about apps being written for apes.  They are trying to figure out if monkeys actually learn or just learn to mimic humans.
And it has pics of monkeys using iPads and computers!
And better yet, they made a mobile bonobo-robot controlled by the bonobo with a a joystick, including remote squirting the human visitors.   And you all thought I was mad.   Bwahahhahahahahahh. big_smile