Re: Screenwriting

thanks.  it works.

Re: Screenwriting

what script would you recommend looking at as an example of good formatting and form for a horror movie?

Re: Screenwriting

Well, formatting isn't restricted just to genre.  All scripts should follow the same basic format.  If you're talking story structure, that's a completely different beast and will take a lot more explaining than I can do in the space of this little box.  Screenwriting is a craft and isn't going to be learned just by me giving you a quick list of dos and don'ts.  You're gonna have to do some homework and practice, practice, practice. 

You can start by picking up some of these books:

The Screenwriter's Bible, by David Trottier
How To Write a Selling Screenplay, by Christopher Keane
How to Write a Script in 21 Days: The Inner Movie Method, by Viki King
Screenplay, by Syd Field

And checking out screenwriting discussion sites, such as:

www.simplyscripts.com
www.screenwritinggoldmine.com

And reading as many screenplays as you can get your hands on, from such places as:

www.simplyscripts.com
www.script-o-rama.com
www.imsdb.com
www.joblo.com

And if you can find a copy, I also recommend a documentary called Tales from the Script (2009).  Very informative and gives you the lowdown on screenwriting as a career.

Re: Screenwriting

thanks.  i watched Tales from the Script.  it was entertaining.  this will stay a hobby for me.

Re: Screenwriting

Writers block... for years.

Re: Screenwriting

Hello mates!
So...I'm a noob to this site AND to Screenwriting. I have written many "stories" but not into a script. I am currently in my 2nd year of college and I am going for film. I wish to be a producer/director. However, I do not know how to exactly write a well written script!!
Any tips and advice for a noob as myself??
Thanks smile

Re: Screenwriting

LoudLon wrote:

Well, formatting isn't restricted just to genre.  All scripts should follow the same basic format.  If you're talking story structure, that's a completely different beast and will take a lot more explaining than I can do in the space of this little box.  Screenwriting is a craft and isn't going to be learned just by me giving you a quick list of dos and don'ts.  You're gonna have to do some homework and practice, practice, practice. 

You can start by picking up some of these books:

The Screenwriter's Bible, by David Trottier
How To Write a Selling Screenplay, by Christopher Keane
How to Write a Script in 21 Days: The Inner Movie Method, by Viki King
Screenplay, by Syd Field

And checking out screenwriting discussion sites, such as:

www.simplyscripts.com
www.screenwritinggoldmine.com

And reading as many screenplays as you can get your hands on, from such places as:

www.simplyscripts.com
www.script-o-rama.com
www.imsdb.com
www.joblo.com

And if you can find a copy, I also recommend a documentary called Tales from the Script (2009).  Very informative and gives you the lowdown on screenwriting as a career.



Actually nvm this is very helpful, thank you!! smile

Re: Screenwriting

Ooh!  I helped someone!  Take that, father who said I'd never amount to anything! big_smile

If you end up writing anything and want some unbiased feedback, drop me a line. smile

Re: Screenwriting

LoudLon wrote:

Ooh!  I helped someone!  Take that, father who said I'd never amount to anything! big_smile

If you end up writing anything and want some unbiased feedback, drop me a line. smile


Hahaha, well you have indeed been very helpful, and to a student!! Thank you I'll probably be dropping a link of a script on here in due time big_smile

Re: Screenwriting

TaigaMonstrosity wrote:

Hello mates!
So...I'm a noob to this site AND to Screenwriting. I have written many "stories" but not into a script. I am currently in my 2nd year of college and I am going for film. I wish to be a producer/director. However, I do not know how to exactly write a well written script!!
Any tips and advice for a noob as myself??
Thanks smile

Welcome to the MADhouse. Can't wait to read your stuff. And good luck with your projects. smile

Re: Screenwriting

kXnPunk wrote:
TaigaMonstrosity wrote:

Hello mates!
So...I'm a noob to this site AND to Screenwriting. I have written many "stories" but not into a script. I am currently in my 2nd year of college and I am going for film. I wish to be a producer/director. However, I do not know how to exactly write a well written script!!
Any tips and advice for a noob as myself??
Thanks smile

Welcome to the MADhouse. Can't wait to read your stuff. And good luck with your projects. smile

Oh why thank you, sir! smile
Glad to be here, everyone thus far is awesome!

Re: Screenwriting

Yes everyone is just amazing here. Best online community I ever been on and I'm online since 1984 so imagine how cool it is. lol

You might want to head to the Introduce thread to say hi to everyone.
http://www.horror-movies.ca/Forum/viewt … 96#p596096

Re: Screenwriting

And we have monkeys and pandas! lol

Re: Screenwriting

^^^
Indeed. The only place in the world that does. big_smile

Re: Screenwriting

Thanks............................:)

Re: Screenwriting

Two of my all time favorite shows are The Shield and Breaking Bad.  There will be some

*** SPOILERS ***

reference these shows in this post.

I've been curious about something for a while.  Not sure if its a screenwriting question or not, but think this is a good place to ask.

The Shield ran for 7 seasons, and Breaking Bad 5, with the last episode to go next week.  In both these shows, things kind of fell apart for the main characters, and they end up hating each other, and / or even killing each other (we'll see what happens with BB next week).  Things get disastrous for them.

My question is, when the show was created / formed, was that the plan?  Did the writer(s) know that things would dissolve that way?  Or was it possible things would end with the characters being close?  How did either decision come to be?  Was it just the story line growing, and getting to that point?  Is it outside influence?

I just use The Shield and Breaking Bad as examples.  This really could apply to any other relevant show.  Honestly, I just don't get how this stuff works, and I am often impressed by the insight members here have, so thought I'd ask.

Re: Screenwriting

To me that isn't a screenwriter yet, writer yes but screen not yet but I've seen every damn special features on all of my huge collection and in the commentaries, often they talk about how the script evolves. Most of the time their few first episodes are set in cement but as characters develop and ideas flow, it changes.

Now why that character acts this way with all the others and why the others act that way, I guess it's that they decided to take that road all follow it whatever happen, even Ghosts in the forests or big huge mooses on the pavement. lol

Maybe they also have plans for the series' future. My 666 cents though,

But I know that in Heroes, Claire Bear Hayden was supposed to die. Even her self healing couldn't do anything against it. Some kinda chemical bomb like stuff if I remember correctly...

So yeah I bet the scripters and show crew follow some ideas but these get slapped away by the new ones.

The basics of human mind, try, when new one comes replace... big_smile

I like to keep my old ideas in a drawer in the back of my mind though. I don't trash them... Hahaha

Last edited by kXnPunk (2013-09-23 23:01:56)

Re: Screenwriting

One thing that's spoken of quite a bit in screenwriting is that before you start, know your ending.  You have to know what your characters' final destinations are to be, so that you have something to steer them towards. 

I've read interviews with the creator of The Sopranos where he said that from day one, he always knew what the final scene of the series was going to be, right down to how it was going to be shot.  The showrunner on Dexter said the same thing.  And Kurt Sutter, who created The Shield, said that about that show and has said the same thing about Sons of Anarchy -- they all know the ultimate ending they want to have, and each season is a matter of steering the characters toward that predetermined fate.

And as far as individual seasons go, when the writers get together the showrunner will tell them okay, here's what I want to do this season, this is what I envision occurring, and here's where I think we should end up, to give us momentum going into further seasons.  And the writers get to work batting around ideas for each episode, creating and solidifying storylines for every character, planning and plotting how all these individual storylines cross and intersect and influence one another and contribute to the whole -- but all the while, they know that everything must culminate and lead to the conclusion already ordained by the showrunner.

But every good showrunner leaves himself flexible.  If during the writing sessions a writer comes up with a better idea than what he or she him/herself had, they'd be foolish to adhere slavishly to their own.  Breaking Bad is actually a good example of this; the showrunner had envisioned killing Jesse off in season 1 but changed his mind when he saw how good Aaron Paul was in the role, and saw the potential of the character.  If he'd stuck to that pre-ordained vision, the show would have suffered for it.  Or like in The Walking Dead season 3, the showrunner didn't plan on killing Andrea off beforehand but as the season's storyline progressed, he decided she had to go in order to serve the overall arch of the season. 

So what it all comes down to that yes, showrunners all typically know how they're going to end everything, but they're smart to remain flexible and go with the flow.

Re: Screenwriting

^^^
Wise and full of learningation curve these words once more my friend.

That's why I am not a screenwriter yet. I'd screw them all up right in the seasons but leave millions of seasons with just the most badass character, probably a girl fighting the Big Boss, failing, healing, trying again, failing, healing, trying again, failing, healing, trying... lol

No idea if people would watch though. And I don't care, I'm not at that point yet. Mwahahaha

Re: Screenwriting

The idea with your main character is to really put the screws to them.  Give them a goal to achieve but refuse to make it easy for them.  Throw obstacles in their way that test their limits, and it really helps if they have a personal character flaw or a tragedy that both haunts and drives them.  There has to be an external struggle -- the obstacles standing in their way to their goal, and an internal struggle -- their own inner flaws that make overcoming those obstacles even more of a challenge.

Walter White from Breaking Bad is a great example of inner need vs inner flaw vs external goal.  His inner need is to secure his family's financial future before he succumbs to cancer.  His internal flaw is that he's egotistical and his single-mindedness has cost him his morals.  His external goal is to avoid being caught.  But his need, his flaws and his goal are all diametrically opposed to one another -- and that's the key to creating good drama.

That's what every writer should aim for, whether they write horror, comedy (which, as the saying goes, is really drama in disguise), action, thrillers, what-have-you.  If the drama is strong, the rest will fall into place.

Re: Screenwriting

Yeah I agree with the knowledge you just threw in my teeth. And it was cool to read and see how you develop it.

So I'm happy that the goal in my so called story hold the road without twitching an inch.
Tragedy, the loss of her prince dude. Kidnaped by the Big Boss, damn reminds me of Megaman's latest one, insanely hard to beat the sucker was.

Goal is to deliver him of course and trash down the Boss. Drama is she constantly has to search for plants and study her magic to be able to heal after what the beast threw at her.

And think of a new plans while having to suffer mad pain. Works well I think...

Ah well, Try and try again... Again, And aga... lol

Last edited by kXnPunk (2013-09-24 06:55:12)

Re: Screenwriting

Interesting guys...thanks. 

Punk - I'd check out your character. 

Interesting to think that usually people won't know when a show will end.  That if they're lucky enough to know when it will end, and get a chance to end it, writers will need to then steer the show to the ending they envisioned.

Lon - Now that you mention it, I had heard that about Jesse.  Did you ever end up checking out The Shield?  Last I knew you were on the verge but hadn't committed.

Re: Screenwriting

Still on my "get to it when I get to it" list.  Incidentally, Michael Chiklis' and Walt Scoggins' fates were spoiled for me just the other night; I'd just finished watching the finale of Dexter and was reading some fan reaction, when some dip-shit referenced The Shield and gave those characters' endings away.  Fine, so The Shield has been off the air for a few years now, but still!

Re: Screenwriting

Ghostseeker, why??? O_O

Are you saying I myself have to check it over or that YOU would like to check it out. Clarify please. lol

Last edited by kXnPunk (2013-09-25 15:48:56)

Re: Screenwriting

Punk - You mean why am I asking about The Shield?  Not sure I understand, but if that's it...The Shield is still in my all time favorite shows.  Right there with Walking Dead, Breaking Bad and Game of Thrones.  It was the first show that gave me that...HOW WILL I WAIT TILL NEXT WEEK TO SEE WHAT HAPPENS!!??!?!??!?...feeling. 

If nothing else, check out the first episode.  It still has my all time favorite scene in TV history...with Kid Rock blaring, its intense.