Topic: Longevity of newer movies

Do you think that a popular series like Saw or Parnormal Activity will continue to be made 10-15 years from now? Will they stand the test of time like Halloween, Friday the 13th, and Nightmare on Elm Street have lasted?

Re: Longevity of newer movies

simple answer to that is No!

Re: Longevity of newer movies

Just because movies like Friday the 13th and such are standing the test of time and being made to this day doesn't mean they are good movies, so I wouldn't even say standing the test of time is a good thing.

Last edited by Scavenger of Human Sorrow (2013-06-24 14:20:58)

Re: Longevity of newer movies

Totally agree, I'm not a big fan of the Friday the 13th series either, but something about it has made it successful, maybe a comfortable familiarity with the character.

Re: Longevity of newer movies

I was thinking about this yesterday actually, and I think the key to a good/profitable slasher film is a certain likeability to the main villain (Jason Vorhees, Freddy, Norman Bates, etc.).

I really think it comes down to that in certain situations.

Re: Longevity of newer movies

I think they'll try, but unless the concept is truly unique instead of trying to recapture the glory days it's not going to work out very well. It's not even working now. Hatchet anyone? Supposedly a return to form for modern slasher flicks that harkens back to the 80's heyday.... uh, yeah no. Not at all.

Re: Longevity of newer movies

The only thing Hatchet would be remembered for is being a bad movie.

Last edited by Scavenger of Human Sorrow (2013-06-24 16:28:04)

Re: Longevity of newer movies

Scavenger of Human Sorrow wrote:

The only thing Hatchet would be remembered for is being a bad movie.

But then there's that rabid fanbase that keeps crying for more... ugh.

Re: Longevity of newer movies

^ I don't get it. And it's not even the 'so bad it's good' type, just plain out bad.

Re: Longevity of newer movies

Right there with you, man.

Re: Longevity of newer movies

What about Laid to Rest/ Cromeskull? I could watch a few more of those if the ever make them..

Re: Longevity of newer movies

BubRub wrote:

What about Laid to Rest/ Cromeskull? I could watch a few more of those if the ever make them..

Felt like a case of trying too hard to me.

Re: Longevity of newer movies

Scavenger of Human Sorrow wrote:

^ I don't get it. And it's not even the 'so bad it's good' type, just plain out bad.

Ditto

Re: Longevity of newer movies

If they made more Behind The Mask: The Rise and Fall of Leslie Vernon films that would make a excellent franchise.

Re: Longevity of newer movies

NonEuclidean wrote:
BubRub wrote:

What about Laid to Rest/ Cromeskull? I could watch a few more of those if the ever make them..

Felt like a case of trying too hard to me.

Not sure what that means... I will agree that the hatchet movies are almost unbearable, though.

Re: Longevity of newer movies

in general the state of today's films and most film studios is the most depressing i've ever known it. yeah i know it don't take much to depress me but as long as  i can remember i have loved film but the best you can say for the majority made these days is average and forgettable.

Re: Longevity of newer movies

wolfman1959 wrote:

in general the state of today's films and most film studios is the most depressing i've ever known it.

I blame Hollywood and the death of independent film. You used to be able to go to a indie film fest and see movies made by a bunch of no names, starring a bunch of no names. Pretty much people putting their heart and soul into a project.

Now you go to a festival and you see a Zach Braff movie that he funded on kickstarter...

He earned $3,105,473 for the movie while some promising film maker no one knows about missed out on his or her chance to make it big.

http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/186 … was-here-1

true story.

Re: Longevity of newer movies

As cliché as it is to say, Hollywood may have done some great things for film, but it brought it a long way down.

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It seams like everything has been done so it's hard to create characters people can fall in love with because the new characters remind us of the old. As soon as you see mask you think Michael or Jason. The best I can hope for in a horror movie now a days is it makes sense, the acting is good, and no cgi. Now a days I can't watch a horror movie without thinking of another that it reminds me of. It is what it is, like I said on another thread movies are for the young who haven't seen all these movies.

Re: Longevity of newer movies

^Then with that in mind will these newer series last with yolunger generations or will it grow stale to fast? I don't think film is much worse off now than in the past. Perhaps less to my liking, but not outright bad. And there are still many successful independent films, but they seem few and far between.

Re: Longevity of newer movies

^^^^^They wont last because people have options now. We have so many things to do from going online, playing video games, to watching movies. People forget fast now a days. Back in the day you would go to a movie and talk about it with your friends the next day. Hardly anyone does that now. Sometimes people would watch a movie several times. Remember when they use to have the dollar theatres.


That's another thing people dont talk as much. Any office I go to half the people are texting. What's that one movie with Bruce Willis were everyone has a robot who does everything for them while they stay inside the house. Then at the end of the movie everyone comes out in what seams like forever. I really feel that's were society is going.

Re: Longevity of newer movies

This was an interesting question Theli.  Would some of the series being made today stand the test of time, and continue to be made in 10-15 years?  I'm not trying to be a jerk, but most the responses were about how bad movies are today.  That's a different issue in my opinion. 

Unfortunately, unless something changes, I would say yes, that many series today will continue to be sequeled and remade in 10-15 years.  I think Paranormal and Saw are great examples (given by Theli).  These will be milked as long as there is money to be made.

Now, will they be regarded with the same favor that Friday and Elm St are?  I don't know.  However, you have so many true horror fans that knock those series, and also those that hate Paranormal and Saw.  Not sure there's much a difference in those situations really.

*** EDIT ***

Or maybe I misunderstood the OP.  It was written continue to be "made."  So I was interpreting that as whether the sequeled series of today will continue to be made in 10-15 years.

Now, if the point is would movies today have the same popularity in 10-15 years that things like Friday and Elm St did.  I would say some would.  Like Mike wrote though, the choices we have now may make that harder.

Last edited by Ghostseeker (2013-06-26 16:00:36)

Re: Longevity of newer movies

Yeah you had it right Ghostseeker, I meant are they going to continue making them, but I kind of meant both. Will they popular enough to continue to be made and still successful financially?

I would argue that they are similar in quality to their sequeled predecessors. Arguably the best Friday the 13th, Nightmare or Halloween is the first, same could be said for Saw and Paranormal. And even that the series was somewhat fresh for the first 3 (I at least like the 3rd Paranormal Activity), but like the aforementioned horror flicks they went severely down hill afterwards (New Nightmare is an exception IMO).

Edit: I think Saw will last, or at least be remade with perhaps a new series in a decade or so, but Paranormal Activity will die out, with the exception of a possible remake many years from now.

Last edited by Theli (2013-06-27 00:06:18)